Year in Review 2017

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December 20, 2017

From our editors

Like others covering global affairs, our team at OpenCanada.org spent much of 2017 reevaluating the needs of our readers in light of the many changes in the world of foreign policy — such as the ushering in of a Donald Trump presidency, a new Canadian foreign minister, renewed negotiations on the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and the heightened urgency around human rights issues, including the persecution of the Rohingya and treatment of women worldwide.

International news this year has been fast-paced and often unpredictable. As a fairly young digital publication with a specific focus — foreign affairs from a Canadian point of view — our team attempted to respond to the world’s changes by seeking out the stories and angles readers would not be exposed to elsewhere. 

2017 also saw a renewed interest in Canada and its progressive policies. While we covered those issues at large — from refugee resettlement to Canada’s new feminist international assistance policy and its digital “election integrity initiative” — we also asked tough questions around, for instance, the lack of new development dollars and potential contradictions in the government’s feminist approach, especially when dealing with the United States.

Here, we highlight some of the pieces we were particularly proud of this year. As the world continues to look to Canada for guidance, especially during its G7 presidency in 2018, we will continue to both celebrate and question Canadian leadership along the way. As always, many thanks to our readers in Canada and beyond for your engagement on these important issues, and for your support of OpenCanada.org.

Eva Salinas, Managing Editor
Catherine Tsalikis, Senior Editor

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IWD 2017: MSF’s Joanne Liu on a world in denial

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Accounting for Histories: 150 years of Canadian maple washing

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Humanitarians under fire

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Surveillance in Canada: Who are the watchers?

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Canada’s future foreign policymakers 2017: Meet the millennials making a mark in international affairs

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The erasure of Indigenous thought in foreign policy

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NAFTA Negotiations: Your guide to the players and priorities that matter

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The Unmaking of Myanmar

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End of a royal era

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Enter the online regulation era

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With Singh, a new chapter for Canada-India relations

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How to build a better, bolder and braver world in 2018

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