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Newman: Does the ‘royal’ rebranding of the Canadian Forces have a wider meaning?

By: /
22 August, 2011

Sadly, I fear it does. Returning the “Royal” prefix to the navy and the air force now makes it appear that the Prime Minister was bewitched by Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, and has come down with a case of Monarchist fever.

Beginning with the Battle of Vimy Ridge in 1917, the Canadian Military has been struggling to have a stand alone identity, a project which appeared complete with the unification of the forces and the Canadian Flag in 1966.

Now making the navy and the air force “Royal” to the British Monarch is a step backward. Internationally it will blur Canada’s identity as an independent player, making it more difficult for our country to play its proper role.

And what might be next? The return of the Union Jack and the repeal of the Nichol resolution?

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