Canada’s post-pandemic foreign policy: three big questions

Roland Paris / @rolandparis

Professor, public and international affairs, University of Ottawa

Roland Paris is a professor of public and international affairs at the University of Ottawa, Associate Fellow of Chatham House and founder of the Centre for International Policy Studies. He has taken several leaves from his academic career to serve in government, most recently as senior advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on global affairs and defence. Previously, he was visiting fellow at the Institut d'études politiques (Sciences Po) in Paris, assistant professor the University of Colorado-Boulder, visiting researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC, and director of research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country’s largest think tank. He has also served in several advisory positions in government, including in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Privy Council (Cabinet) office. In addition, he was appointed to a 10-member group of international experts advising the secretary general of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). He is currently a member of the Advisory Council to the Deputy Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada; a member of the International Advisory Board of Cambridge University's Centre for Geopolitics; and a Fellow of the Halifax International Security Forum.

Most Recent Posts

Baird’s Honesty Gap

Baird’s Honesty Gap

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April 16, 2013

Roland Paris on why John Baird calling the location of his controversial meeting in East Jerusalem “irrelevant” doesn’t add up.

All Quiet in Bahrain

All Quiet in Bahrain

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April 5, 2013

Roland Paris on why John Baird’s silence on abuses in Bahrain exposes Canada’s inconsistent diplomacy.

What Winston Churchill Could Teach Stephen Harper

What Winston Churchill Could Teach Stephen Harper

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September 2, 2011

Prime Minister Stephen Harper offered another glimpse into his foreign policy thinking yesterday – and it may help to explain why Canada’s foreign ministry has received so little love from his government. On his way to a summit meeting in Paris, Harper stopped at an Italian airfield to thank Canadian military personnel who were part […]

Four Reasons for Optimism in Libya

Four Reasons for Optimism in Libya

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August 26, 2011

As Jennifer writes, “the work in Libya is not done. It is just beginning.” In addition to securing the capital and country, the National Transitional Council will quickly need to assume its responsibilities as Libya’s new government, paying salaries to public servants and ensuring the provision of basic services including water, healthcare and electricity. Very […]

Crowd-sourcing Terror in Norway

Crowd-sourcing Terror in Norway

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July 26, 2011

Soon after it emerged that the perpetrator of last week’s horrific attacks in Norway was a white anti-Muslim reactionary rather than an Islamist extremist, there was a backlash against experts who had speculated that the incident was likely the work of al-Qaeda or another jihadist group. The problem, however, was not just with the experts […]

What is Stephen Harper Afraid of?

What is Stephen Harper Afraid of?

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July 14, 2011

Stephen Harper shared his views on international affairs with Maclean’s magazine last week, and it wasn’t a pretty picture. Harper’s world seems to be full of danger and struggle. In response to open-ended questions on foreign policy, he repeatedly came back to these themes. Most interestingly, he offered a Manichean vision of international relations as a […]

Post-Qaddafi Libya: The Next Quagmire?

Post-Qaddafi Libya: The Next Quagmire?

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July 4, 2011

Consider this scenario:  NATO and the Libyan rebels get their wish and Moammar Qaddafi loses power as a result of a coup d’état, a NATO bomb, or a negotiated deal.  Then what happens? Last week, UK Foreign Secretary William Hague offered a brief glimpse of the emerging plan for international involvement in Libya after Qaddafi.  […]

No Republicanism, Please – We’re Canadian

No Republicanism, Please – We’re Canadian

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July 1, 2011

It’s Canada Day and our future king and queen are visiting Ottawa on their first foreign trip as a married couple.  But is this really a “foreign” trip for Will and Kate?  If and when Prince William becomes king, he will not only be Canada’s sovereign; he will symbolically embody the Canadian state, which makes it hard […]

R2P v. ICC?

R2P v. ICC?

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June 25, 2011

I continue to believe that military intervention was warranted in the face of Muammar Qaddafi’s explicit threats against the population of Benghazi. But it’s also true that humanitarian intervention creates its own problems, including those which André identified in his latest post on the difficulties of implementing the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in practice. Let […]

Greetings!

Greetings!

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June 20, 2011

Hello, CIC Roundtable and comrades Hancock, Pratte and Welsh. I’m looking forward to our virtual conversations on this blog. By way of introduction, I’m a university professor and occasional visitor to the policy world, having served twice in government and as research director of Canada’s largest think tank. Although my own research focuses on international […]