OpenCanada Staff

The staff at OpenCanada.org.

Most Recent Posts

Canada’s future foreign policymakers 2017: Meet the millennials making a mark in international affairs

Canada’s future foreign policymakers 2017: Meet the millennials making a mark in international affairs

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July 12, 2017

From representing Canada at the United Nations and supporting the Canadian foreign minister on international visits to taking part in free trade talks and working on Canada’s international assistance review, the global experiences open to young Canadians today are myriad. For the second year in a row, OpenCanada is featuring some of the best and brightest […]

Video: 150 years of Canadian foreign policy

Video: 150 years of Canadian foreign policy

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May 15, 2017

On July 1, Canada celebrates 150 years of nationhood — marking the uniting of three British colonies (Canada, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). How has Canada’s foreign policy changed over time? With the anniversary in mind, this OpenCanada video, written by journalist Michael Petrou and animated by Emmy Award-winning art director Santosh Isaac, explores the challenges […]

Twitterati 2016: The Canadian Foreign Policy Edition

Twitterati 2016: The Canadian Foreign Policy Edition

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December 21, 2016

As global interest in Canada continues, and new voices from academia and politics emerge on social media, this year OpenCanada shines a light on Canadian foreign policy Twitterati.   This group differs from our past lists, which have highlighted Canadians doing great work abroad and Canadians making valuable additions to foreign policy conversations at large. […]

OpenCanada at 5: A look back at some of our favourite pieces

OpenCanada at 5: A look back at some of our favourite pieces

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June 8, 2016

Five years ago, in the national offices of the Canadian International Council, a conversation was underway. As our founding editor Taylor Owen wrote in his first post, “the discussion was centred around a single question: What if the CIC wanted to build the online hub for international affairs discussion in Canada?” After rigorous planning and […]

OpenCanada is turning 5!

OpenCanada is turning 5!

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May 20, 2016

With
a June 9 panel on the state of leftist foreign policy, OpenCanada marks its
fifth anniversary! Join our team, The New Republic’s Jeet Heer, The Nation’s Sarah Leonard, and Postmedia’s Terry Glavin at CSI Spadina.

10 things the 2015 ISA convention taught us

10 things the 2015 ISA convention taught us

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February 20, 2015

The annual convention of the International Studies Association was held this year in New Orleans. The critiques were sharp as ever, the views even better and yes, there was even one internet-loving unicorn.

Redrawing borders

Redrawing borders

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November 18, 2014

What do borders mean today? In this graphic, we consider a number of ways of conceptualizing the divisions between us beyond just nationality.

The Green Energy Gap

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July 21, 2014

While the consumption of renewable energy is growing, the world still has a long way to go if it wants to phase out fossil fuels.

The Burgeoning Business of International Education

The Burgeoning Business of International Education

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June 18, 2014

The benefits of cross-border education go beyond the fees that international students pay. It is increasingly a way for a country to project itself on the world stage. This graphic breaks down the flow of international students and where Canada fits in.

Will 2014 End Up Like 1914?

Will 2014 End Up Like 1914?

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April 22, 2014

Dr. Lawrence H. Summers’s remarks at the CIC Globalist of the Year Gala on the upheavals of the 20th century and how to avoid them in the 21st.

Foreign Lands

Foreign Lands

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February 25, 2014

We crunch the numbers on where Canada and the United States stand in terms of their immigrant populations.

Putin’s Party

Putin’s Party

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February 7, 2014

The Sochi Olympics will cost Russia $50 billion. In this graphic, we look at why the bill got so high.

The Best Readings of 2013

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December 20, 2013

Throughout the year, OpenCanada.org scours the web for the best reads on global affairs for our Readings section. Here are our 10 favourites from 2013. Garrisoned on a Shipwreck In a remote corner of the South China Sea, the Philippine government ran a Second World War-ear ship aground on a submerged reef to be used […]

The Best of OpenCanada.org in 2013

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December 20, 2013

Over the course of 2013, OpenCanada.org published 324 blog posts and comments, 32 essays, 54 interviews, and 16 graphics. Here are our 10 favourite pieces from the past year. ON DEVELOPMENT Starting a New Canadian Aid Conversation “Canada’s foreign aid conversation is lost,” wrote John McArthur in the introduction to his series on Canadian aid […]

Joining Forces to Fight Hunger

Joining Forces to Fight Hunger

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December 9, 2013

Debate continues over the role of public-private partnerships in providing development assistance. We spoke to World Food Programme Ass. Exec. Dir. Elisabeth Rasmusson about that agency’s approach.

Global Shift

Global Shift

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November 25, 2013

We asked the experts at the Toronto Global Forum to tell us what they consider to be the biggest shift now under way in the global economy.

What’s Holding Europe Back?

What’s Holding Europe Back?

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November 21, 2013

Many are wondering when or if the Eurozone will shake off the recession. OECD Chief Economist and Deputy Secretary-General Pier Carlo Padoan explains why achieving higher sustainable growth defies simple solutions.

Keeping Watch

Keeping Watch

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November 13, 2013

We map out the regional responsibilities of each member of the Five Eyes intelligence network.

CSR’s Global Surge

CSR’s Global Surge

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October 10, 2013

Companies today are grappling with the challenge of enforcing standards across globalized supply chains. OpenCanada asked Hershell Ezrin how Canadian companies are faring, and where the concept of corporate social responsibility is headed.

The Deutsch View

The Deutsch View

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October 1, 2013

OpenCanada interviewed Werner Wnendt, Germany’s ambassador to Canada, about Merkel’s election victory, Germany’s role in Europe, and its relationship with Canada.

Want to Save the World?

Want to Save the World?

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September 23, 2013

Many girls in the developing world will grow up without ever entering a classroom. The Girl Rising campaign aims to change that. We asked Holly Gordon, the campaign’s executive director, to tell us how.

Think Local, Adopt Global

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August 22, 2013

With 153 million orphans worldwide, many Canadian families choose to adopt children from other countries. OpenCanada breaks down the international adoption process.

How Do You Aid?

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July 18, 2013

The U.S. spent almost $34 billion on foreign assistance last year. Over $9 billion of that was spent on security and military aid. We break down how much economic vs. security aid went to the 10 top recipients.

The ABCs of the TTIP

The ABCs of the TTIP

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July 12, 2013

Gary Hufbauer spells out what’s at stake in the U.S.-EU Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership as talks begin.

CIC-Toronto’s 7th Annual Midsummer’s Evening Get Together

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July 9, 2013

Speeches will begin at 6:15pm. Douglas Goold, Director, Asia Pacific Foundation – The Year Ahead in Foreign Affairs Jo-Ann Davis, President, CIC-Toronto branch – Your Toronto Branch CIC-Toronto on the back patio (inside if rain) Hors d’oeuvres / Cash Bar RSVP: encouraged, but not required for attendance Contact: toronto@opencanada.org | 416-590-0630

Two Nations Divisible?

Two Nations Divisible?

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July 1, 2013

We talked to Michael Adams, head of the research company Environics, about the evolution of Canadian versus American social values.

Pumping Carbon

Pumping Carbon

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June 27, 2013

Obama says he wants a low-carbon, clean energy economy. That would be a change. Here we track the history of carbon emissions as new sources of energy have come online.

Betting on Brazil

Betting on Brazil

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June 26, 2013

We asked Canada’s Ambassador to Brazil, the Honourable Jamal Khokhar, about Brazil’s economic prospects in the face of challenging global trends.

Three Canadian Water Myths

Three Canadian Water Myths

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June 24, 2013

Ralph Pentland, author of Down the Drain: How we are Failing to Protect our Water Resources, debunks three of the biggest myths about Canada’s water resources.

Africa’s Rising Resource Challenges

Africa’s Rising Resource Challenges

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June 17, 2013

Natural resources are playing an important role in Africa’s economic growth. Experts from NSI’s Ottawa Forum explain why governance of the extractive industry is critical if the benefits and risks are to be shared equitably.

The 0.7% Promise

The 0.7% Promise

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June 17, 2013

In 1970, we committed to spending 0.7% of our GDP on aid. In the 44 years since, only a small handful of countries have reached that goal. Canada never has. Here we track the progress made by eight countries.

Karzai’s Long Goodbye

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June 5, 2013

Pamela Constable in the The Washington Post canvasses opinion on whether power will really change hands when Afghans head to the polls to vote for a new president in April 2014.

Tunisia’s Arab Spring

Tunisia’s Arab Spring

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June 3, 2013

An interview with Hamadi el-Jebali, Tunisia’s first democratically elected prime minister, about his country’s transition to democracy

Iran Readings from the World Wide Web

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May 22, 2013

Not Talking to Iran The Harper Government has adopted a policy of non-engagement with various regimes bearing poor human rights records, including Iran. The Globe and Mail looks at Canada’s recent decision to sit out the Iran-led round of Conference of Disarmament nuclear nonproliferation talks, set to take place this month. Various scholars weigh in […]

Saeed Rahnema on Sanctions, Elections, and Refugees

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May 22, 2013

Saeed Rahnema is a professor of political science and public policy at York University, author, and frequent commentator on the Middle East. Below, Professor Rahnema answers questions on the impact of economic sanctions, Iran’s upcoming elections, and Canada’s approach to Iranian refugees. How have international sanctions impacted the lives of ordinary Iranians? How would you […]

Linda Frum on Human Rights in Iran

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May 22, 2013

Linda Frum is a Conservative member of the Canadian Senate, writer, and journalist, and outspoken critic of human rights abuses in Iran. Below, Sen. Frum answers questions on Canadian policy toward human rights in Iran, the relationship between nuclear aggression and domestic oppression, and what Canada can do to protect human rights around the June […]

Michael Petrou on the Long Reach of Iran

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May 22, 2013

You’ve travelled across the Muslim world to study the effects of 9/11 on those societies. What, if anything, is distinctive about the Iranian experience of the global war on terror? Has the GWOT affected the evolution of human rights in Iran? Following the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, Iran and America cooperated to […]

Dr. Payam Akhavan on the Democratization of Iran

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May 22, 2013

The Canadian government, among others, has been focused on the Iranian regime’s nuclear program, as well as its support for terrorist groups. Do you think the human rights in Iran have been sidelined as a result? I think that the human rights issues in Iran tend to be at the margins of most governments’ agendas. […]

Marina Nemat on the Crimes of the Iranian Regime

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May 22, 2013

How has your own experience, detailed in your two memoirs, shaped your view on the Islamic Republic and its system of governance and are your views of the current regime now firmly set? If not, what actions from the regime might cause you to reassess its legitimacy? The Islamic Republic has been in power in […]

Richard Perle on Engaging with Iran

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May 22, 2013

Richard Perle is a Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, former chairman of the Defense Policy Board, assistant secretary of defense for international security policy, and staff member to Senator Henry Jackson (D-Wash.). We asked Richard Perle about the chances of meaningfully engaging the Iranian regime on issues related to human rights and nuclear proliferation. […]

The Business of Human Rights

The Business of Human Rights

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May 14, 2013

Dr. Alexandra Guáqueta, member of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights, on state versus corporate responsibility to protect the human rights of workers in Bangladesh and beyond.

The Betrayal of Darfur

The Betrayal of Darfur

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April 29, 2013

Our interview with Mukesh Kapila, head of the United Nations mission in Sudan in 2003-2004, about the ongoing violence in Darfur

Soldiering On

Soldiering On

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April 25, 2013

Our conversation with Patrick Reed, director of “Fight Like Soldiers, Die Like Children” on his new film with Romeo Dallaire.

Killer Dilemmas

Killer Dilemmas

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April 25, 2013

Our conversation with Dan Krauss, director of the Kill Team, on the stark choices that confront soldiers in war.

From Fear to Freedom

From Fear to Freedom

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April 25, 2013

Our interview with Ann Shin, director of the The Defector: Escape from North Korea, about the risk and hardship North Korean defectors face.

Identity Fusion

Identity Fusion

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April 25, 2013

Our interview with Khoa Lê, director of the film Ba Noi, about coming to Canada and the family left behind.

Breaking the Banks

Breaking the Banks

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April 25, 2013

Our conversation with Corey Ogilvie, director of Occupy, on the social movement that may define our generation.

Economic Ties

Economic Ties

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April 15, 2013

Canada’s economic relationship with Japan, the third largest economy in the world, is an important one – and will become only more important should the two countries agree on a free-trade deal.

The ABC’s of RWP

The ABC’s of RWP

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March 27, 2013

OpenCanada talked to Dr. Malte Brosig about how the Responsibility While Protecting differs from the Responsibility to Protect.

Are We Running Out Of Water?

Are We Running Out Of Water?

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March 22, 2013

Canadians have a way of taking their plentiful water resources for granted. Yes, we have a lot of fresh water, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have to manage it sustainably.

Faith and Foreign Policy

Faith and Foreign Policy

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March 11, 2013

Andrew Preston, author of the award-winning book, Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith, on the role of religion in U.S. foreign policy.

No Bragging Rights

No Bragging Rights

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January 23, 2013

President Obama’s second inauguration brought out an unfortunate Canadian tendency in relation to our American neighbours: smugness.

Troubling Ties

Troubling Ties

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January 22, 2013

Canadian links to the Algerian hostage crisis, albeit unconfirmed, are raising concerns among security experts.

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Who We Wish Would Tweet More

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January 11, 2013

Louise Arbour President and CEO, International Crisis Group | @louise_arbour A former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Arbour now heads the International Crisis Group, one of the premier organizations working on conflict prevention and resolution. She is an authoritative voice in this area. Lloyd Axworthy President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Winnipeg | @lloydaxworthy As minister […]

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Thinkers and Doers

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January 11, 2013

Visiting Scholar, Massey College, University of Toronto | @avrilbenoit Avril Benoît is a former CBC broadcaster and Médecins Sans Frontières communications director. A humanitarian at heart, Benoît mostly tweets on overseas crises and Canadian foreign aid. Chris Blattman Assistant Professor, Columbia University | @cblatts Chris Blattman is a professor of international development at Columbia whose […]

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Who We’d Love To See Start Tweeting

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January 11, 2013

Mark Carney Governor of the Bank of Canada Carney is one of Canada’s most respected leaders, here at home and around the world. Canadians would love to follow his international financial moves more closely, especially after he shifts across the pond. Fen Hampson Distinguished Fellow and Director of the Global Security research program, CIGI A […]

The #cdnfp Twitterati: The CIC On Twitter

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January 11, 2013

National Office Staff The CIC@TheCIC The International Relations and Digital Technology Project@IRDTP Jennifer JeffsPresident | @jenjeffs Naomi JosephManaging Editor, International Journal | @naomi_joseph Taylor OwenSenior Editor, OpenCanada.org | @taylor_owen Claire SchachterDeputy Editor, OpenCanada.org | @c_schachter Laura SunderlandVice President, Programs | @laurasunderland Cameron TulkProduction Manager, OpenCanada.org | @CTulk Scott YoungSocial Media Editor, OpenCanada.org | @scottalyoung

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Politicians and Public Servants

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January 11, 2013

John Baird Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs | @HonJohnBaird John Baird doesn’t mince words, whether on Twitter or the UN floor. Canada’s top diplomat rarely @replies, but last year he did take some time to answer questions that we crowdsourced via #askbaird. Paul Dewar Official Opposition Critic for Foreign Affairs, Canada | @PaulDewar Ottawa Centre […]

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Organizations

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January 11, 2013

Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada @AsiaPacificFdn From the Trans-Pacific Partnership to the panda pact, Canada spent much of 2012 building better ties with Asia. If you aren’t already, it’s a good time to start following Canada’s leading think tank on the region. After the CNOOC-#Nexen deal, what’s next for Canada-#China investment? by @markmackinnon ow.ly/gavad — […]

The #cdnfp Twitterati: Journalists and Writers

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January 11, 2013

Matthieu Aikins Journalist | @mattaikins Matthieu Aikins has reported from Afghanistan for the likes of Harper’s, The Atlantic and The Walrus since 2008, and as U.S. and NATO troops pull out, the Kabul-based Canadian journalist is staying put. His tweets cover all things AfPak, from tales of corruption to Korean food in Kabul. Hadeel Al-Shalchi […]

Networked Cities

Networked Cities

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November 23, 2012

Cities are increasingly becoming global players – hubs for information, goods, and people. And they’re increasingly networked together.

Book Launch: Our North America- Social and Political Issues Beyond NAFTA

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October 18, 2012

The Canadian International Council-Edmonton branch and the University of Alberta International is holding a Book Launch event TODAY! This is a FREE event. Come join us for some delicious Mexican food at the official Book Launch of “Our North America: Social and Political Issues beyond NAFTA” edited by Dr. Julian Castro-Rea. During the launch, Dr. […]

R2P Today

R2P Today

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October 11, 2012

Romeo Dallaire, Art Eggleton, and Martha Hall Findlay on Canada and the Responsibility to Protect.

Required Reading

Required Reading

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September 11, 2012

OpenCanada’s list of 12 IR classics to bolster your reading list when the theoretical going gets tough.

Creating a Job in Haiti

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August 7, 2012

Thirty-one months after the earthquake, Haiti is still struggling to get on its feet. But there is evidence that the aid money pouring into the country is making a real difference. The infographic below details one of these projects: the Peace Dividend Marketplace-Haiti, which works with Haitian businesses to help build a sustainable local economy.

Political Games

Political Games

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July 30, 2012

When you have an event as high profile as the Olympic Games, you know that politics is going to come into it at some point. When the international community wants to make a point about the actions of a rogue nation, banning that country from competing in the Olympics is a very visible way to […]

From Sportsmanship To Statesmanship

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July 30, 2012

Plenty of athletes win trophies or medals, but only a handful become political figures with global sway. Below we list six athletes who have had an impact on international relations. Joe Louis In 1938, American boxer Joe Louis took two minutes to knock out German Max Schmeling. It must have been a satisfying victory for […]

A Fond Farewell

A Fond Farewell

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July 20, 2012

The OpenCanada teams bids a fond farewell to Anouk Dey, the site’s founding Deputy Editor. Anouk was instrumental in helping us craft the OpenCanada concept, and even more importantly, she brought it to life for us. Over the course of OpenCanada’s first year, Anouk’s energy, vitality, and dynamic intelligence populated the site with original material, […]

“Special” Relationships

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July 11, 2012

As the world’s superpower, the United States has cultivated friendships and alliances across the globe, but has only seen fit to call a select few “special.” What exactly sets a “special relationship” (which should not be confused with the more formal Major non-NATO ally designation) apart from a run-of-the-mill alliance, however, isn’t always clear. Behind […]

Figureheads of State

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July 11, 2012

In name, they are one thing. In function, they are something much different. Here is OpenCanada’s list of 10 heads of state who are more figureheads than real leaders. Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom Queen Elizabeth II is the constitutional monarch of 16 states, from Tuvalu to Canada. Mostly known for her steadfast […]

The New Warfare

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June 11, 2012

A live conversation with Brown University’s James Der Derian and author Noah Richler about the changing face of warfare and security. Moderated by the University of Ottawa’s Philippe Lagassé.

Ask Baird

Ask Baird

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June 6, 2012

A year ago, John Baird became Canada’s minister of Foreign Affairs. Since then, Canadian troops have withdrawn from their combat role in Afghanistan, Canada participated in the Libyan intervention, Canada has spoken out forcefully against Iranian nuclear development, and Canada has moved substantially closer in its relations with Israel and China. What does John Baird […]

The Militarization of Aid

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June 6, 2012

A live conversation on the militarization of aid with Retired Lieutenant-General Andrew Leslie, former Chief of the Land Staff. Moderated by The University of Ottawa’s Philippe Lagassé.

Martin: Are the Quebec riots a manifestation of the global Occupy movement?

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June 4, 2012

First, let’s make one thing clear. I play no role in the current protests and don’t agree with all their demands, but I emphatically reject their broad characterization as “riots”. The violence can be traced to small, well-coordinated fringe that does not represent the essence of the demonstrations and that has been much more a […]

The Weekly Dispatch: May 25, 2012

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May 25, 2012

Last week, world leaders met at the NATO Summit in Chicago to finalize withdrawal from Afghanistan. OpenCanada.org took the opportunity to reflect on Canada’s relationship with the alliance, and to think about what threats lie beyond Afghanistan. At the top of this list are cyberspace and the environment. We took a close look at both […]

NATO ± Canada

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May 25, 2012

It’s a give and take relationship. An infographic on what Canada has given NATO and what it hasn’t.

The Weekly Dispatch: May 4, 2012

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May 4, 2012

This week, OpenCanada.org launched our biggest series yet, The Future of Fighting: How the Canadian Military Must Adapt. The opening chapter of the seven-part series examined how the Afghanistan experience changed Canada’s outlook on the world, with Roland Paris insisting that Canadian foreign policy is about more than just contributing troops, and Steve Saideman taking […]

Better Know Your World Bank Presidents

Better Know Your World Bank Presidents

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April 25, 2012

President Obama did not nominate Jeffrey Sachs to the presidency of the World Bank. He also did not nominate Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. In some ways, though, President Obama nominated a hybrid of the two most highly touted candidates. In the Korean-born Dr. Jim Yong Kim, Obama checks the development box and, at least partially, the non-American […]

The Weekly Dispatch: April 20, 2012

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April 20, 2012

This week, OpenCanada.org tackled the French, the World Bank and sex. John Hancock’s analysis of the first round of the French election and what it indicates about shifting global politics is a must-read. Also check out our Rapid Response for thoughts from Rob Prichard, Jeremy Kinsman and others on the most innovative thinkers on Canada’s […]

Opera, community united behind arts benefits all

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April 16, 2012

April 16, 2012, James Wright, Vancouver Sun There is no shortage of “cultural” studies, not to mention eminent voices in the arts, which will tell you public and private investment in culture can pay dividends for us all. This is something those of us who are lucky enough to work in this sector fervently believe. […]

Isabel Studer’s Continental Vision

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February 3, 2012

Isabel Studer, founding director of the Centre for Dialogue and Analysis on North America in Mexico, describes systems of production that are not Mexican, American, or Canadian – but North American. This video is part of the CIC’s ongoing series, “Did KeystoneXL Kill the North American Idea?”

Samantha Nutt

Samantha Nutt

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January 24, 2012

CIDA is paying private contractors to build houses in Haiti. Dr. Samantha Nutt elaborates on her Globe op-ed.

2011 International Book List: Robert R. Fowler

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January 4, 2012

Questions for Author Robert R. Fowler: 1. What is the best international affairs book you have read in 2011 (Canadian or otherwise?) War by Sebastian Junger (HarperCollins Canada). 2. What was the biggest international event of 2011? The Arab Spring. 3. Who was the biggest international influencer of 2011? Turmoil in Western financial markets and […]

The CIC Seeks Production Editor

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December 19, 2011

Canadian International Council Position: Production Editor Location: Toronto, ON Closing date for applications: January 13th, 2012 Details: 12 month contract, renewable Compensation: commensurate with experience The Canada International Council is seeking a Production Editor for its international affairs website, OpenCanada.org. Since its launch in June 2011, OpenCanada.org has quickly become Canada’s hub for the debate […]

CIC Book Launch – Issues in Canada-China Relations

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October 17, 2011

The Canadian International Council presents a book launch in celebration of Issues in Canada-China Relations Edited by Pitman B. Potter with Thomas Adams Friday, November 4, 2011 7:30am-9:00am Rideau Club 99 Bank Street Ottawa, ON With remarks by Pitman B. Potter Breakfast will be served The launch of Issues in Canada-China Relations is generously sponsored […]

An Interview with Catherine Swift

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September 8, 2011

An interview with Catherine Swift At the beginning of the month, The Globe ran a series of pieces talking about corporate spending in relation to the money that corporations have on hand. The Globe called it a spending crisis. Why do you think corporations aren’t spending? They have no confidence in the economy right now. They certainly […]

Thunder Bay Branch Conference: The Challenge of Globalization

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August 8, 2011

The Thunder Bay branch of the Canadian International Council is pleased to announce an international conference on “The Challenge of Globalization” to be held in Thunder Bay on April 25-26. The conference will focus on the economic, socio-political and security aspects of globalization from both global and local perspectives, including our responses to emerging realities. […]

The Prospect of Mature Canada-China Trade Relations

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August 8, 2011

Foreign Minister John Baird vowed, during his July 16-20 trip to China, to build closer and deeper ties with China. Good for him. There is much to be gained and little to lose from pursuing a mature relationship with China – one that accepts China’s growing importance as a major player on the world stage. […]

Matt Aikins on “Who shot Ahmed Wali Karzai?”

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August 3, 2011

CIC: What, generally, do you think the killing of Ahmed WaliKarzai, President Hamid Karzai’s brother, tells us about the state of unrest in southern Afghanistan? Aikins: Ahmed Wali’s murder, closely followed by the assassination of another key figure in President Hamid Karzai’s network in southern Afghanistan, Jan Mohammed Khan, reminds us how deeply governance in […]

An Interview with Brian Milner

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July 29, 2011

Was the current European crisis caused by a “lack of stability culture” or by the flawed architecture of the single-currency system? Brian Milner: Both, really. The competitive gap between the wealthier euro-zone members and Greece, Portugal, and probably Ireland was far too wide to be bridged by the flexibility of a single currency and the […]

An Interview with Christopher Tidey

An Interview with Christopher Tidey

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July 27, 2011

Could you help us comprehend the scale of the emergency at Dadaab refugee camp?  How does it differ from other refugee camps you have worked at? Christopher Tidey: This is a massive humanitarian crisis across the Horn of Africa region. More than 2.2 million children are estimated to be acutely malnourished, with 780,000 at risk […]

International Intellectual Property Conference

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July 25, 2011

The Canadian International Council (CIC) presents: CANADA AND THE GLOBAL COMPETITION OVER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ASSETS A CIC by-invitation conference that will take place on October 6 & 7, 2011. For more information, please contact nanwer@opencanada.org; 416-946-7210. OVERVIEW When it comes to innovation, the world is not flat. Regions that drive the global economy with cutting-edge […]

Brazil Forum

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July 25, 2011

The Canadian International Council and the Center for Hemispheric Policy at the University of Miami present BRAZIL FORUM Tuesday, September 27, 2011The Fairmont Royal York Hotel, Toronto 7:30 – 8:00 a.m. – Registration and Continental Breakfast8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Conference12:00 – 1:45 p.m. – Luncheon DOWNLOAD AGENDA › Topics:Among the issues to be discussed are […]

2011 CIC Globalist of the Year: Naguib Sawiris

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July 25, 2011

FIFTH ANNUAL CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL GALA DINNER  Jim Balsillie and Geoff Beattie cordially invite you to attend a Gala Evening Special presentation of the 2011 Globalist of the Year Award to Naguib Sawiris Mr. Sawiris stood in support of protestors in Tahrir Square during the revolution and is committed to political liberalization in his country […]

An Agenda for the Great Lakes Region

An Agenda for the Great Lakes Region

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July 6, 2011

While he didn’t get the details right, Joel Garreau was onto something when he wrote Nine Nations of North America in 1981. Too often, we look at North America as three nations, when in fact it is also comprised of 94 states, provinces, and territories. In economic terms, supply-chain dynamics have made North America a series […]

Margaret MacMillan and Clay Shirky discuss the impact of Wikileaks with the CIC

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June 9, 2011

CIC: Will Wikileaks revelations require revising the historical record? Will historians have to revisit their work? MacMillan: Historians are always revising the historical record. New material comes out—someone discovers a diary or letters in an attic or new boxes turn up in archives. When the Soviet Union and its empire collapsed it suddenly became possible […]

International Journal

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May 22, 2011

Since its inception in 1946, the International Journal has been recognized as Canada’s pre-eminent scholarly publication on international relations. Readers benefit from wide-ranging research and analysis by scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, Canadian and non-Canadian. View publications ›

GPS Project

GPS Project

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March 16, 2011

Last fall, the Canadian International Council (CIC) decided that it was the right time to take a hard look at Canada’s global role and priorities. The financial crisis was highlighting shifting geopolitical dynamics. Meanwhile, our country was poised to assume a highly visible international profile, hosting the Olympic Games in the winter and the G8 […]