2016: Year in Review

By: /
December 16, 2016

From our editors

2016 marked a new start for OpenCanada.org. Invigorated from a site redesign in late 2015 and from a palpable interest in Canadian foreign policy following the election of Justin Trudeau, the year began on a high note.

 As a digital publication, we value innovation and change. With that in mind, we dove head first into the world of longform journalism, the natural and necessary counterpart to opinion editorials — on-the-ground reporting to help put policy into perspective. May Jeong took us to the Kandahar Province Canada’s military left behind; Ed Struzik painted a picture from the Canadian Arctic, where economic development is needed but challenging; Naheed Mustafa brought us into the homes of those living with the digital vulnerabilities of war.

To mark OpenCanada’s fifth anniversary in June, we launched a series exploring a possible ‘leftist’ foreign policy, featuring Owen Jones, Vijay Prashad, Terry Glavin and others. It was part of a long list of carefully curated essays that addressed this year’s most critical issues, from Jeremy Kinsman’s Brexit takeaways to Stephen Marche’s reflection on Canadian exceptionalism.

We also asked tough questions around Canada’s foreign policy: its role in the building of a future Kurdish state; what more Canada could do to improve the global refugee system; how Trudeau has fared overall on the global affairs file, one year into his mandate; and more.

With the recent election of Donald Trump, more eyes than ever are on Canada as we go into 2017. The war in Syria has reached a turning point but is far from over. The future of surveillance, trade agreements and pipeline projects is uncertain. Expect continued thoughtful analysis from our contributors on these topics, and in the meantime our editorial team would like to thank you, our readers, for continuing to be part of the engaged community found at OpenCanada.org.


Taylor Owen, Editor-in-Chief
Eva Salinas, Managing Editor

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