OpenCanada.org

Canada's Hub for International Affairs

Projects

The Natural Resources and Foreign Policy Project

This year the CIC is tackling one of the most important questions facing Canadians: How can we be smart about developing our abundant energy, mineral and forest resources? The voracious appetite of emerging economies for natural resources presents Canada with some key foreign policy challenges in the coming years.

This year the CIC is tackling one of the most important questions facing Canadians: How can we be smart about developing our abundant energy, mineral and forest resources? The voracious appetite of emerging economies for natural resources presents Canada with some key foreign policy challenges in the coming years. The resources boom — forecast to continue for at least a decade — offers Canada opportunities to reposition itself globally through new trade and investment alliances. But it also presents new threats. How can Canada, for example, expand its trade with Asia while ensuring that it continues to move up the value chain? How can we resist the pressure to ship raw materials as fast as possible and instead become more deliberative about extracting more value from our resources by building complementary knowledge- and technology-based industries? How should Canada structure its foreign investment regime? What impact will new alliances and the growing role of resources in the economy have on Canada’s global brand? Other resource-rich countries are struggling with these same questions. This research seeks fresh perspectives on these issues through broad consultations within Canada and by looking at whether countries such as Australia, Norway, Finland, Chile and others hold any lessons for Canada. The study will produce a multimedia report with specific and targeted policy recommendations.

The project is co-directed by Jennifer Jeffs, CIC President, and Madelaine Drohan, Canada’s correspondent for The Economist.

 

The Resourceful Canadian e-discussions

As part of the project, OpenCanada.org will be hosting three e-discussions that tackle three important questions regarding our resources: How can Canada manage the “dirty oil” brand? How can Canada turn its mining knowledge into international power? And how can we become the most intelligent lumberjacks in the world? Click on the banner below to access the debates.

 

Global Positioning Strategy

The CIC’s Global Positioning Strategy (GPS) for Canada project, which culminated in the release of Open Canada: A Global Positioning Strategy for a Networked Age in June 2010, was the centrepiece of the CIC’s 2009-2010 research program.

The CIC’s Global Positioning Strategy (GPS) for Canada project, which culminated in the release of Open Canada: A Global Positioning Strategy for a Networked Age in June 2010, was the centrepiece of the CIC’s 2009-2010 research program. The report was authored by Edward Greenspon, the former Editor in-Chief of Canada’s national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, who was supported by a panel of digitally savvy, globally focused and professionally networked individuals. This panel took a hard look at Canada’s global role and priorities and made a number of fresh observations and recommendations that have been discussed internationally in newspapers, on television and radio shows, and in blogs and social media networks since the report’s release.

Panelists

André Beaulieu
Vice-President,
Value Creation and Procurement,
Bell Canada
Cathy Beehan
Founding CEO,
Action Canada
Gerald Butts
President and Chief Executive Officer,
World Wildlife Fund Canada
Mark Cameron
Director, Corporate Affairs with Ontario Power Generation
John Hancock
Counsellor, Trade and Finance Division,
WTO Secretariat
Jonathan Hausman
Vice-President, Alternative Investments and Emerging Markets Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan
Farah Mohamed
President,
Belinda Stronach Foundation
George Roter
Co-CEO and Co-Founder,
Engineers Without Borders Canada

Stéphane Roussel
Professor,
Université du Québec à Montréal

Mercedes Stephenson
Host and Producer, Mercedes Stephenson Investigates
and Vice-President, Breakout Educational Network

Kristina Tomaz-Young
Founder and Producer, Venture Capital TV and President and Practice Leader, Smart Initiatives, Inc.
Yuen Pau Woo
President and CEO, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

For more information, contact info@onlinecic.org

The International Intellectual Property Project

The centrepiece of the CIC’s 2010-2011 research program is the International Intellectual Property (IP) project, which addresses Canada’s position in the international intellectual property regime, and its relevance to Canadian competitiveness and innovation.

The centrepiece of the CIC’s 2010-2011 research program is the International Intellectual Property (IP) project, which addresses Canada’s position in the international intellectual property regime, and its relevance to Canadian competitiveness and innovation. The CIC considers IP to be a fundamental but insufficiently explored aspect of Canadian international policy and engagement and is therefore examining Canada’s IP policies in an international comparative context.

 This project is co-directed by Jennifer Jeffs, CIC President, and Karen Mazurkewich, a business journalist and former Wall Street Journal foreign correspondent.



Intellectual Property Report

The final project report makes specific recommendations for policy action to improve Canada’s IP regime in the context of its innovation strategy and policies.

Rights and Rents
Why Canada must harness its intellectual property resources

Karen Mazurkewich
October 2011

DOWNLOAD REPORT ›

 



Intellectual Property Conference

The report and its findings were featured and examined at an international conference on intellectual property that the CIC hosted in Ottawa in early October 2011. 

Keynote Speech 

Marshall C. Phelps, Jr.
Former corporate Vice-President for Intellectual Property Policy and Strategy at Microsoft Corp
and IBM Corp., and Co-founder of Intellectual Ventures

IP FAQ

Karen Mazurkewich interviews conference participants and asks key questions about the role of IP in Canada.

 



Related Links

When Patents Attack!
Source: thisamericanlife.org July 22, 2011

 

Strategic Studies Working Group

The Strategic Studies Working Group produces and promotes research, conferences, seminars and publications addressing defence and security issues within the context of Canada’s international relations and foreign and defence policies. It endeavours to inform the Canadian public and relevant policy makers and stakeholders of Canada’s vital interests and values and the threats or potential threats to them.

The Strategic Studies Working Group (SSWG) is a partnership between the Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute (CDFAI) and the Canadian International Council (CIC), which incorporates the former Canadian Institute of Strategic Studies.

 

Canada’s Strategic Profile 2013

The Strategic Profile consolidates important demographic, economic and military data into a concise document that allows for a quick yet detailed overview of where Canada stands in terms of defence and development.

 

The Canadian Forces in 2025

The Canadian Forces are in transition after Afghanistan. Equipment needs to be replaced, personnel are worn down, and government policy is uncertain. What will the future look like? Five distinguished experts here examine each of the three services, space, and cyberwarfare, postulating the future as it might be – as it will likely be – in 2025. Their accounts will surprise and enlighten readers.

 

Drone Week: Kill Watch Aid

Whether for their military (kill), surveillance (watch), or humanitarian (aid) capability, drones have begun to make a mark on the world of international affairs. As interest in the use of unmanned systems  grows, so too does the need to scrutinize our assumptions and probe the limitations of knowledge about them. The Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute and the Canadian International Council’s Drone Week provides that space.

 

Canada’s Strategic Profile 2012

The Canadian Forces Strategic Profile outlines Canada’s military, at home and abroad.

Forces Abroad

 

The Future of Fighting

In 2011 came the end of Canada’s longest ever military commitment. Over the course of 10 years, Canada spent more than $18 billion on its mission in Afghanistan. Over the next 10 years, where should military resources be allocated?

The Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute and the Canadian International Council’s The Future of Fighting e-conference explored this question in depth with a 7 week series of op-eds and online conversations moderated by the University of Ottawa’s Philippe Lagassé.

 

Papers

View SSWG papers

 

Strategic Datalink

View Strategic Datalink reports

 

Contact SSWG

Please contact us at:
Phone 613-288-2529 | E-mail contact@cdfai.org

Arctic Sovereignty and Security

The Arctic is a region currently undergoing massive transformation with immense security and environmental implications for each circumpolar state. Arctic sovereignty and security are about understanding how each of the circumpolar states and, Canada in particular, protects and promotes its Arctic region. The CIC Arctic Sovereignty and Security Working Group involved the work of three CIC research fellows, each of whom published a research paper as part of the Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow series.

The Arctic is a region currently undergoing massive transformation with immense security and environmental implications for each circumpolar state. Arctic sovereignty and security are about understanding how each of the circumpolar states and, Canada in particular, protects and promotes its Arctic region. The CIC Arctic Sovereignty and Security Working Group involved the work of three CIC research fellows, each of whom published a research paper as part of the Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow series.

CIC Senior Research Fellow

Franklyn Griffiths

CIC Research Fellows

Rob Huebert
Whitney Lackenbauer

Reports

Canadian Arctic Sovereignty and Security
in a Transforming Circumpolar World

Rob Huebert | July 2009.
Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 4
Download Document 

From Polar Race to Polar Saga: An Integrated Strategy
for Canada and the Circumpolar World

P. Whitney Lackenbauer | July 2009.
Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 3
Download Document

Towards a Canadian Arctic Strategy
Franklyn Griffiths | June 2009.
Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 1
Download Document

Border Issues

The CIC Border Issues Working Group explored the Canada-US border from security, economic and political perspectives by looking at how the United States and Canada can protect each other through increased border efficiency and security, while maintaining their competitive edge and quality of life in an era of emerging economies and alarming global forces.

The health and efficiency of the Canada-US border is fundamental to the economic well-being of both countries. Since the events of 9/11, the US government has undertaken various measures to secure its borders from potential additional terrorist attacks. This has hindered the flow of goods, services and people with subsequent negative effects on both the American and Canadian economies.

The CIC Border Issues Working Group explored the Canada-US border from security, economic and political perspectives by looking at how the United States and Canada can protect each other through increased border efficiency and security, while maintaining their competitive edge and quality of life in an era of emerging economies and alarming global forces.

CIC Research Fellow

Margaret Kalacska

CIC Research Associates

Geoffrey Hale
Birgit Matthiesen

Working Group Members

Michael Kergin (Chair)
Chantal Blouin
Douglas Goold
Geoffrey Hale
Margaret Kalacska
Birgit Matthiesen
Daniel Schwanen

Reports

Toward a New Frontier Improving the U.S.-Canadian Border
Christopher Sands | July 2009
Download Document  

Technological Integration as a Means of Enhancing Border Security and Reducing Transnational Crime
Margaret Kalacska | July 2009. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 2
Download Document

In Search of Effective Border Management
Geoffrey Hale | February 2009. A Changing World: Canadian Foreign Policy Priorities. No. 3
Download Document

A New Bridge For Old Allies
Michael Kergin and Birgit Matthiesen | November 2008. CIC Working Group Report
Download Document

Canada and the Americas

The CIC’s Canada and the Americas project examined a range of the strategic, economic, political and social policy challenges which Canada currently faces and will likely need to confront in the future in its relations with Caribbean and Latin American countries.

The Americas have historically been, and to a large extent are still, perceived as a region dominated by the United States. Canada has nonetheless played an active role in the region, from peacekeeping in Central America and Haiti, to democracy building throughout the region, to collaborations with regional and national military, judiciary, governance, and aid agencies in efforts to help bring peace, prosperity, and good governance to this region.

The CIC’s Canada and the Americas project examined a range of the strategic, economic, political and social policy challenges which Canada currently faces and will likely need to confront in the future in its relations with Caribbean and Latin American countries.

CIC Research Fellow

Stephen J. Randall

CIC Research Associate

Lana Wylie

Reports

Reassessing Canada’s Relationship with Cuba in an Era of Change
Lana Wylie | October 2010. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 11
Download Document 

Canada, the Caribbean and Latin America: Trade, Investment
and Political Challenges

Stephen J. Randall | August 2010. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 9
Download Document

Canada and the Americas: Human Rights, Development, and Foreign Aid
Stephen J. Randall | August 2010. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 8
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Canada’s National Security Challenges in the Caribbean and Latin America
Stephen J. Randall | September 2009. Strategic Datalink. No. 12
Download Document

Canada-India Relations

The CIC’s Canada-India Relations project explored why the potential for Canadian business in India has never been fully realized, either in terms of trade or foreign direct investment, and made recommendations on what needs to be done by both business and government.

India is one of the world’s most promising markets, and the country is a priority both for the Government of Canada and for many of the provinces.

The CIC’s Canada-India Relations project explored why the potential for Canadian business in India has never been fully realized, either in terms of trade or foreign direct investment, and made recommendations on what needs to be done by both business and government.

CIC Senior Research Fellow

Douglas Goold

CIC Research Fellow

Ryan Touhey

Reports

Doing Business in India: Success, Failure and the Prospects for Canada
Douglas Goold | November 2010. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 10
Download Document 

A New Direction for the Canada-India Relationship
Ryan Touhey | August 2009. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 5
Download Document

China

The CIC China Working Group examined Canada-China relations and prepared recommendations for the bilateral relationship in the context of three thematic areas: domestic contexts for engagement, economic relations between Canada and China, and collaboration between the two countries on global issues.

Given the ever-growing importance of China and the enormous impact its growth is having and will continue to have on the world, it is critical that Canada be better prepared and equipped to manage its relations with China.

The CIC China Working Group examined Canada-China relations and prepared recommendations for the bilateral relationship in the context of three thematic areas: domestic contexts for engagement, economic relations between Canada and China, and collaboration between the two countries on global issues.

On October 13, 2010, the CIC China Papers were presented in China at a CIC-China Institute of International Studies conference marking the 40th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Canada and the People’s Republic of China.

CIC Research Fellows

Jason (Guangyu) Wang

CIC Research Associates

Charles Burton
Margaret Cornish

Working Group Members

Pitman Potter (Chair)
Brian Job
Jeremy Paltiel
Yuen Pau Woo

Reports

Canada-China Space Engagement: Opportunities and Prospects
Wade L. Huntley | February 2011. China Papers. No.20
Download Document

The Dragon Returns:
Canada in China’s Quest for Energy Security

Wenran Jiang | October 2010. China Papers. No.19
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Canadian Studies in China
Brian L. Evans | August 2010. China Papers. No.18
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Misunderstanding and Miscalculation: How China Sees Canada in the World
Scott McKnight | August 2010. China Papers. No.17
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Global Transnational Crime: Canada and China
Margaret Beare | July 2010. China Papers. No.16
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The Canada-Taiwan Parliamentary Friendship Group
Myles Hulme | July 2010. China Papers. No.15
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Chinese Industry and Foreign Economic Policy: Lessons for Canada
Wenran Jiang | July 2010. China Papers. No.14
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The Global Governance of Biotechnology: Mediating Chinese and Canadian Interests
Yves Tiberghien | July 2010. China Papers. No.13
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China’s Capacity to Respond to the H1N1 Pandemic Alert and Future Global Public Health Crises: A Policy Window For Canada
Lesley Jacobs | June 2010. China Papers. No.12
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China and the Arctic: Threat or Cooperation Potential for Canada?
Frédéric Lasserre | May 2010. China Papers. No.11
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Flows of People and the Canada-China Relationship
Kenny Zhang | May 2010. China Papers. No.10
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Bridging “Forbidden” and “True North” Nations: Taiwan’s Agency in Canada’s China Policy
Der-yuan Wu | March 2010. China Papers. No.9
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Structure and Process in Chinese Foreign Policy: Implications for Canada
Jeremy Paltiel | March 2010. China Papers. No.8
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China’s Cyberspace Control Strategy: An Overview and Consideration
of Issues for Canadian Policy

Ronald Deibert | February 2010. China Papers. No. 7
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Canada in China’s Grand Strategy
Jeremy Paltiel | January 2010. China Papers. No. 6
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China as an Environmentally Responsible Global Citizen
Arthur J. Hanson | January 2010. China Papers. No. 5
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Benchmarking Canada-China Economic Relations
Victor Z. Chen | January 2010. China Papers. No. 4
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Working with China towards a New International Institutional Architecture: A Strategic Partnership with Canada on Global Issues of Mutual Interest
Barry Carin and Gordon Smith | January 2010. China Papers. No. 3
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Immigrants from China to Canada: Issues of Supply and Demand of Human Capital
Peter S. Li | January 2010. China Papers. No. 2
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Ensuring Canadians Safe Access to Pharmaceutical Products through
Canada-China Cooperation

Catherine Côté | January 2010. China Papers. No. 1
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The Development of China’s Forestry Sector and its Implications for Canada
Jason (Guangyu) Wang | September 2009. Foreign Policy for Canada’s Tomorrow. No. 6
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A Reassessment of Canada’s Interests in China
Charles Burton | February 2009. A Changing World. No. 4
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Energy

The CIC Energy Working Group highlighted the nexus of Canadian energy and domestic policy with foreign policy issues and priorities, with a focus on two particular issue areas, climate change and electricity policy, projects that aimed to inform and provoke the Canadian policy debate – federally and provincially – by examining the linkages between climate change policy, electricity policy and foreign policy.

Canada is one of the world’s largest per capita consumers of energy and the largest external supplier of energy to the US market. The energy sector, broadly defined, occupies a significant place in the Canadian economy. As a moderately large producer and very large consumer of energy, Canada has a significant economic and geopolitical interest in the global forces and trends that will drive energy production and consumption in the years ahead.

The CIC Energy Working Group highlighted the nexus of Canadian energy and domestic policy with foreign policy issues and priorities, with a focus on two particular issue areas, climate change and electricity policy, projects that aimed to inform and provoke the Canadian policy debate – federally and provincially – by examining the linkages between climate change policy, electricity policy and foreign policy.

CIC Research Associate

Annette Hester

Working Group Members

Joseph Doucet (Chair)
Carl Calantone
Edward Goldenberg
David Keith
Hal Kvisle
Robert Millar

Reports

Climate Change and Foreign Policy in Canada: Intersection and Influence
John Drexhage and Deborah Murphy | August 2010
Download Document  

Power Connections: Canadian Electricity Trade and Foreign Policy
Roger J. Goodman | June 2010
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The New Global Energy Geopolitical Game: Is Canada Ready to Play?
Annette Hester | January 2009. A Changing World: Canadian Foreign Policy Priorities. No. 2
Download Document