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Canada's Hub for International Affairs


Contrary to popular narrative, Greece's present mess occurred because it followed European doctors’ orders too closely. The recent deal might only make it worse.
Smoke rises from the Khan al-Waseer area near Aleppo's historic citadel, during what activists say were clashes between rebel fighters and forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, as seen from a rebel-held area December 30, 2014. REUTERS/Rami Zayat (SYRIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT) - RTR4JMXO

Documenting the Syrian conflict

The destruction of historical buildings in Syria pales in comparison to the human tragedy unfolding. But it sheds light on the need for documentation, and future rebuilding of the country.

A voter enters a polling station for the Federal Election in Toronto, May 2, 2011.     REUTERS/Mark Blinch (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) - RTR2LWRY
Iranians gesture as they celebrate in the street following a nuclear deal with major powers, in Tehran July 14, 2015. Iran's president Hassan Rouhani said on Tuesday a nuclear deal with major powers would open a new chapter of cooperation with the outside world after years of sanctions, predicting the "win-win" result would gradually eliminate mutual mistrust. 
REUTERS/TIMA
ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. NO SALES.  - RTX1KAPN

‘Outdated’ Iran policy makes Canada a global outlier

Current approach isolates Canada and affects its ability to communicate productively with Tehran.

On Iran, a triumph for diplomacy

The deal is the best chance for a peaceful resolution of the standoff over Iran’s nuclear program, despite a profound double standard.

Jul 10, 2015; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper poses with Canadian athletes at the Pan Am Athletesí Village before the opening ceremony for the 2015 Pan Am Games at Pan Am Ceremonies Venue. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports - RTX1JXYA

Is Canada Pan-American Dreaming?

While Toronto hosts the Pan Am Games, more concrete regional ties are eroding.

Canadian Forces Major General Jon Vance places poppies on the plaques honouring the country's fallen soldiers during the last Remembrance Day ceremony after troops finished their combat mission there in July at Kandahar Air Field, November 11, 2011.          REUTERS/Ryan Remiorz/Pool      (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: ANNIVERSARY CONFLICT MILITARY) - RTR2TVXS

Contrasting Military Chiefs: U.S. and Canada

Steve Saideman looks at how the two positions differ, and what the two new appointees, U.S. Marine General Joe Dunford and Canadian Army General Jon Vance, have in common.

  • Slaves at sea


    Lax maritime labour laws and an insatiable global demand for seafood have led to an increase in harsh labour practices on the seas — practices “so severe that the boys and men who are its victims might as well be captives from a bygone era,” writes Ian Urbina in The New York Times. Part of its four-part “Outlaw Ocean” series.

  • The Greek Warrior


    Last winter when Greece called a snap election, Yanis Varoufakis interrupted his professorship in Texas, flew home and launched an election campaign whose sole expense was the cost of gas for his motorcycle. The New Yorker‘s Ian Parker tells the story of the now-former finance minister: “It was as if Christopher Hitchens had woken up Secretary of State.”

  • Atwood’s outlook


    Can we change our world fast enough to avoid being destroyed by it? Margaret Atwood asks in an essay in Matter. Atwood describes possible scenarios for a world dependent on oil and facing critical water risks. The warning signs are already here, she says, but so are innovative solutions. Some call this speculative fiction, or even cli-fi. Truth is, it is not fiction at all.

  • Ukraine’s Chechen fighters


    It may surprise you to know that hundreds of Chechens are fighting in the battle for Ukraine – on both sides. Some fight for Kiev, driven by anger towards Russia. But others are happy to fighting alongside pro-Russian forces in Eastern Ukraine. Shaun Walker explains why Chechens are volunteering on either side of the battle. From The Guardian.

  • Identity Crisis


    “The crisis of the EU has two sides,” writes Timothy Snyder in The NY Review of Books. “One is political, about the lack of democracy within European institutions; the other is philosophical, about the erosion of Europe as a source of and home for universal values.” On view in Greece and Ukraine, they show why Europe’s identity needs to reform.

  • How to beat ISIS


    Syria’s Kurds, led by the YPG, have become the most successful fighting force against ISIS. “[Their] unwavering determination,” writes Adnan R. Khan, “is a mirror image of the Islamic State: a group of fighters driven by ideology and a near-fanatical desire to establish a space for themselves… But is fanaticism the only way to kill fanaticism?” From Maclean’s.

In Depth

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