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Iranians gesture as they celebrate in the street following a nuclear deal with major powers, in Tehran July 14, 2015. Iran's president Hassan Rouhani said on Tuesday a nuclear deal with major powers would open a new chapter of cooperation with the outside world after years of sanctions, predicting the "win-win" result would gradually eliminate mutual mistrust. 
REUTERS/TIMA
ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. NO SALES.  - RTX1KAPN

Current approach isolates Canada and affects its ability to communicate productively with Tehran.

On Iran, a triumph for diplomacy

The deal is the best chance for a peaceful resolution of the standoff over Iran’s nuclear program, despite a profound double standard.

Jul 10, 2015; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper poses with Canadian athletes at the Pan Am Athletesí Village before the opening ceremony for the 2015 Pan Am Games at Pan Am Ceremonies Venue. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports - RTX1JXYA

Is Canada Pan-American Dreaming?

While Toronto hosts the Pan Am Games, more concrete regional ties are eroding.

Canadian Forces Major General Jon Vance places poppies on the plaques honouring the country's fallen soldiers during the last Remembrance Day ceremony after troops finished their combat mission there in July at Kandahar Air Field, November 11, 2011.          REUTERS/Ryan Remiorz/Pool      (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: ANNIVERSARY CONFLICT MILITARY) - RTR2TVXS

Contrasting Military Chiefs: U.S. and Canada

Steve Saideman looks at how the two positions differ, and what the two new appointees, U.S. Marine General Joe Dunford and Canadian Army General Jon Vance, have in common.

A woman prays next to a grave in Potocari, near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 11, 2015. The bodies of the 136 recently identified victims of Srebrenica massacre are buried in Potocari during ceremonies to mark the 20th anniversary of the massacre. Abandoned by their U.N. protectors toward the end of a 1992-95 war, 8,000 Muslim men and boys were executed by Bosnian Serb forces over five July days, their bodies dumped in pits then dug up months later and scattered in smaller graves in a systematic effort to conceal the crime. More than 1,000 victims have yet to be found. REUTERS/Antonio Bronic - RTX1JZIR

Lessons in peace-building, 20 years after Srebrenica

The international community failed at preventing mass atrocities during the Bosnian war, but has it also failed in its nation-building efforts there since?

A U.S. soldier stands guard at the looted former nuclear facility in Tuwaitha, which made fissile material, about 25 km south of Baghdad, May 12, 2003.  The U.N. nuclear watchdog agency said on Monday it wanted to investigate reports that Iraqis living near the looted nuclear facility  showed signs of radiation sickness and hoped soon to get permission to do so. - RTXLY1O

A nuclear agreement in need of Canadian leadership

Canada plays a key role in efforts to realize a treaty to ban the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons‎.

Summer-Reads

OpenCanada’s Summer Reads of 2015

Indulge in a little R&IR this summer with these 10 recommended reads.

  • Ukraine’s Chechen fighters


    It may surprise you to know that hundreds of Chechens are fighting in the battle for Ukraine – on both sides. Some fight for Kiev, driven by anger towards Russia. But others are happy to fighting alongside pro-Russian forces in Eastern Ukraine. Shaun Walker explains why Chechens are volunteering on either side of the battle. From The Guardian.

  • Identity Crisis


    “The crisis of the EU has two sides,” writes Timothy Snyder in The NY Review of Books. “One is political, about the lack of democracy within European institutions; the other is philosophical, about the erosion of Europe as a source of and home for universal values.” On view in Greece and Ukraine, they show why Europe’s identity needs to reform.

  • How to beat ISIS


    Syria’s Kurds, led by the YPG, have become the most successful fighting force against ISIS. “[Their] unwavering determination,” writes Adnan R. Khan, “is a mirror image of the Islamic State: a group of fighters driven by ideology and a near-fanatical desire to establish a space for themselves… But is fanaticism the only way to kill fanaticism?” From Maclean’s.

  • The new Cold War


    As polar ice continues to melt, the race to claim resources in the Arctic heats up. Canada, the U.S., Denmark, Norway, and Russia have all laid claims on this geopolitical hotspot. Territorial disputes and espionage are well underway to give one of them the winning advantage. Laura Kurek gives six reasons to watch this region, from The Wilson Quarterly.

  • Ethical dilemma


    The apparel industry has changed dramatically since the 90s. But Michael Hobbes argues in The Huffington Post that boycotting isn’t helping sweatshops workers. “Consumers’ power… depended on brands forcing their supply chains to do better. [Now] the really atrocious violations, the ones most likely to proliferate, are in places where we have no influence at all.”

  • Governing the sea


    “Few places on the planet are as lawless as the high seas [and] today’s maritime laws have hardly more teeth than they did centuries ago,” writes Ian Urbina for The New York Times. The Dona Liberta is among the most persistent of scofflaws – it routinely abuses crew, is in massive debt, and has a long list of other offenses. Who and what can govern the high sea?

In Depth

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