OpenCanada.org

Canada's Hub for International Affairs

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The BRICS and U.S. positions on an outer space code of conduct are at odds, and Canada is walking a tightrope between them. By Paul Meyer

U.S. election: Notes on the circus to the South

How a divided Republican vote will likely mean another fragmented government to come. By Stephen Blank

North American cooperation: A must for next government

Time for Canada’s national leaders to address how they will better manage integration between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico.

Election 2015: Where is the debate on defence and security?

Instead of a passing reference during general debates, Hugh Segal explains why there should be a specific discussion on defence issues.

We’re hiring: Senior Research Analyst, Arctic Affairs

OpenCanada, on behalf of CIGI and in collaboration with News Deeply, is hiring a Senior Research Analyst focused on Arctic affairs.

A 100-day plan to get Greece back on track

Next month’s elections will likely give Alexis Tsipras another chance to get Greece’s financial house in order. Here’s how.

More military reserves, better deployment decisions?

Harper is pledging to increase reserves — an opportunity not for more military might, but for more Canadians to be invested in missions.

  • Fortune-teller of Kabul


    For centuries, mystics in Afghanistan have played the role of “village elder, a judge, a psychiatrist, a fixer of all things.” In this Guardian piece, May Jeong speaks to one particular fortune-teller in Kabul, whose clients seek an escape – emotional or physical – from the suffering of every day life in a country ravaged by war.

  • El Salvador’s children at risk


    For the Globe and Mail, Stephanie Nolen chronicles what it’s like to be a parent in El Salvador today, facing the impossible choice between sending children north with smugglers or seeing them forced into gang membership. “If I send him, he may die,” one mother says. “But if I keep him here, he will die.”

  • Blood diamonds


    The global effort to stop the spread of ‘blood diamonds’ began 15 years ago, but has it become any easier to identify stones mined in unethical and deplorable conditions? “The lineage of one of the most valuable products that many consumers will ever buy in their lifetime remains shrouded in uncertainty,” reports Aryn Baker for TIME.

  • The banlieues of Paris


    After the massacre at the Charlie Hebdo offices earlier this year, tensions are high in France, with both anti-Semitic and anti-Muslim sentiments seemingly on the rise. For The New Yorker, George Packer spends time in France’s ‘banlieues’ and asks: are the city’s immigrant suburbs really incubators of terrorism?

  • Asia’s WWII ghosts


    In Japan, events of the Second World War cast a long shadow. Seven decades after the country’s defeat, memories of the war still stir powerful emotions and divide East Asia. This essay by The Economist explores how the history that both victors and victims are a part of continues to shape the lives of their children and grandchildren.

  • El Salvador’s violent streets


    A shattered truce between El Salvador’s politicians and street gangs has turned the country back into a dangerous war zone where no gang member, police officer, bus driver or child can consider themselves immune to the threat of violence and murder. Stephanie Nolen reports for The Globe and Mail from San Salvador.

In Depth

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